Research Interests

· Cross-Layer/Cross-System Design in Wireless-based Systems. The layered structure is one of the key reasons behind the success of the Internet. There are, however, systems in which cross-layer/cross-system design is appropriate and may even be necessary. Cross-layer/cross-system optimization is a new frontier in the field of wireless-based systems, which will result in new algorithms and significantly improved performance for wireless-based systems, such as cellular networks, vehicular networks, cognitive radio, sensor networks, ad hoc networks, communication-based train control (CBTC) systems, and intelligent transportation systems (ITS).

 

News reports about my research on wireless systems:

 

·       http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/carleton-professor-richard-yu-5g-1.3983924

·       https://carleton.ca/our-stories/story/5g-wireless-nserc-grant/

 

 

·      Connected Autonomous Vehicles (CAVs). Connected vehicle systems provide connectivity among vehicles to enable crash prevention, between vehicles and the infrastructure to enable safety, mobility and environmental benefits; among vehicles, infrastructure, and wireless devices to provide continuous real-time connectivity to all system users. An autonomous vehicle (driverless vehicle, self-driving vehicle, robotic vehicle) is a vehicle that is capable of sensing its environment and navigating without human input. The potential of CV and AV has been acknowledged with the establishment of ambitious research programs around the globe. Despite the potential vision of CV and AV systems, there are numerous design challenges remaining to be addressed before widespread deployment of CV and AV systems.

 

News report about my research on CAVs:

 

·       https://newsroom.carleton.ca/2017/10/12/carletons-richard-yu-receives-funding-for-research-on-connected-and-autonomous-vehicles/

 

 

· Security in Wireless Networks. Security is a big issue in wireless networks. Two classes of approaches, prevention-based (such as authentication) and detection-based (such as intrusion detection), can be used to protect high security wireless networks. As the front line of defense, user authentication is crucial for integrity, confidentiality and non-repudiation. Moreover, intrusion detection systems (IDSs), serving as the second wall of protection, can effectively help identify malicious activities. Many technical challenges remain to be addressed to develop secure wireless networks.

 

News report about my research on wireless security:

 

·       http://www.drdc-rddc.gc.ca/en/dynamic-article.page?doc=tactical-wearables-and-the-self-organizing-network/hyyl17cg

 

 

· Green Information and Communications Technologies (ICT). Green ICTs have a very significant role to play in addressing climate change globally and facilitating efficient and low carbon development. The role of green ITs includes not only the emission reduction and energy savings in ITs sector itself, but also enabling low GHG emissions in other industries, such as electric power. Indeed, ITs are crucial technologies for a smart power grid, which monitors, protects and optimizes the operation of its interconnected elements from end to end with two way flow of electricity and information to create an automated and distributed energy delivery network.

 

· Multimedia over Wireless Networks. The next generation “killer applications” in wireless networks are touted to be multimedia based. In recent years, the scarcity of link bandwidth in wireless networks has motivated the development of adaptive multimedia applications. The research in this area will be focused on adaptively optimizing and trading-off the available resources based on the multimedia content and type of wireless networks.